How Your Local Library Can Help on Your Path to FIRE

A big part of achieving FIRE is lowering your monthly expenses to a point where it would be sustainable to live off of your portfolio earnings/passive income. However, many of us have hobbies that we love, and part of being able to pursue those hobbies includes buying supplies for them. Do you love reading? There’s a good chance you love buying new (or new-to-you) books. Do you love building things? I bet there’s a Craftsmen set that you’re just waiting to go one sale. Do you love knitting? New circular needles would really take the crafts you make to the next level…

The list goes on and on. 

The good news is you don’t have to continue buying the tools for these hobbies. How so? 

Visit your local library.

Stacks on stacks on stacks. Image from pexels.com.

To me, this seems like obvious advice. I grew up poor, and as previously mentioned, one of my favorite free outings was going to our local library, getting cozy in some bean bags, and flipping through Calvin and Hobbes comic books (even though I didn’t quite understand the philosophical undertones when I was seven). The library was a part of my childhood.

However, this isn’t true for everyone. Some people may not have had access to libraries when they were growing up–time, transportation, or distance may not have made it possible to visit the library in person. Additionally, people may not have been part of a family in which going to the library was seen as a great way to pass the time. Or perhaps their families didn’t know about all the great free services the library provides. 

Someone recently posted on reddit that they didn’t realize joining their library was free*. They thought they had to pay and were shocked that they could just go in and borrow a book without money exchanging hands. Well, I’m here to tell you. Libraries are full of free stuff that they want you to take advantage of!

And there’s more than just books. 

Libraries these days are vibrant places that offer a number of resources and services to their uses. My local library offers the following physical items available for check-out:

  • Video games
  • DVDs
  • Magazines
  • Book Club Kits
  • Laptops
  • Museum passes
  • Seeds for your garden
  • Tools
  • Fitbits

Before I made this post, I didn’t even realize they had Nintendo 3DS games! The Nintendo 3DS is the only video game system I have, and I bought it several years ago. In my current stage of life, I have a hard time justifying spending money on video games (especially when that money should be going toward student loans). However, now I can finally try out Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer, because they have it at my local library! Now I don’t have to have some weird guilt-ridden discussion with my inner self about whether or not spending $20 on a game is an irresponsible idea. THANKS, LIBRARY!

I also didn’t know that we have seeds! Unfortunately, I don’t have any gardening space at the moment; but if I move somewhere else in this area, I’ll definitely take advantage of the seed program. All you have to do is write down in the binder what seeds you took, and if your plants are successful, you save a few seeds from your plants and bring them back to replace what you used. Hooray for sustainability and empowering communities to grow their own food (which can also help on your path to FIRE)!

They offer classes and services, too. 

Interested in learning something new? There’s probably a class for that. In addition to ESL and Citizenship classes, my local library offers free access to Mango Languages, an online language-learning program (which is great, because I am still trying to learn German. Am I good at it yet? Nein.). Want to learn how to research your family tree? Take a genealogy class (and get free access to Ancestry.com!). My neighborhood library also offers financial literacy classes and fitness classes!

Want to learn how to create a dang virtual reality (VR) experience? THEY MIGHT HAVE A CLASS FOR THAT! At least, my library does, although we are located in Silicon Valley so that probably helps. But your library might have something similar! I’ll be going this weekend to learn how to leverage Unity and other VR programs to create my own VR experiences (time to make my own google cardboard!). 

For those of you with kids, the library also provides a number of programs to keep you and your little one engaged and having fun. For instance, my local library has storytimes, teen craft nights, children and teen book clubs, and, from what I observed on my last visit, some kind of mommy and me yoga situation.

You don’t even have to go in person to take advantage of the library. 

Most libraries offer access to ebooks that you can download to your e-reader or read online. Many also have subscriptions with audio book services, so you can drop that $15/month Audible subscription and listen to books for free from your library. Some libraries allow for unlimited audiobook downloads, while others may limit to four or five a month. 

Will you have to wait sometimes? Yes. I’ve been on the waitlist for Michelle Obama’s Becoming for several months now. But that just makes me more excited to read it–anticipation is everything. And, frankly, there are way more books I want to read than I have the money to buy. Waiting is a small price to pay for unlimited access to any book I could ever want. 

Many libraries also offer access to some kind of streaming service, such as Kanopy or Hoopla. These streaming services provide free access to hundreds of documentaries, audio books, movies, and musical albums. Some libraries don’t even require you to go in person to sign up for these services–you can register online! 

If there’s something you’re interested in, there’s a good chance your library can hook you up with the right resources, without you paying a dime. 

If you haven’t paid a visit to your local library recently, I strongly encourage you to do so. There’s a wealth of resources, and all you need to do to access them is sign-up**.

*Although many libraries are funded with taxpayer money, so you’re already paying for it a little bit anyway!

**Some libraries require some sort of proof-of-residency, like a utility bill or photo ID with your address. However, I’ve never had to verify my information at any of the libraries I’ve signed up at in the last five years. Policies vary from library to library!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s