Open Grocery October 2019

Last month I made the first post in a series called Open Grocery. Every month, I will share a spreadsheet with all of my grocery purchases–dated, itemized, and notated. 

Not my groceries! Photo from pexels.com.

Why am I doing this? 

For one thing, I think it’s interesting to see patterns in my own spending. Is there something I’m spending an inordinate amount on that’s unnecessary? Are certain items flukes? Am I buying too much processed food and not enough fresh food?

Also, lists and spreadsheets are fun. And it’s nice to have some cold hard statistics through this blog, which often explores topics that Gaby Dunn referred to in Season 2 Episode 1 of her podcast Bad with Money as “Finances and Feelings.” 

If you’d like to get into the cold hard numbers, they’re available on this Open Grocery 2019 Google Sheet

Here are some fun facts from the last two months:

I spent an almost identical amount on fake meat products in October as I did in September.

In September, I spent $12.67 on various meat substitutes (LightLife burgers, hi-protein veggie burgers from TJ’s). In October, I spent $12.96 on meat substitutes (more hi-protein veggie burgers, tofurkey lunch slices). Because fake meat is generally more expensive than natural vegan proteins like tofu or beans, this was something I was planning on cutting out in the future; however, $13 is doable (especially when I get 26 grams of protein from one $1.75 veggie patty). 

I spent more money on alcohol in October than I did in September.

This one doesn’t surprise me. My partner left Germany at the end of August, and I just ended up not really drinking after he left. I figured it would just make me sad. Now that I’m used to the life of a lonely spinster (ha ha ha), I’ve started drinking a teensy bit more. In September I bought a bottle of wine; in October I bought a six-pack of beer and one can of sparkling wine (WOOO). Like the fake meat, this amount isn’t so large that I feel the need to cut back. 

I discovered that Safeway digital coupons don’t always depict the correct products. 

One of my downfalls from last month were coupon errors. As in the case of the Chocolove bars, sometimes the coupon shows an item, and we think we understand what it’s for, but the fine print indicates otherwise. This also happened with my Outshine fruit bars–the coupon was for only the regular fruit bars, not the chocolate-dipped ones (even though they’re the same price, you just get one less bar). I had this happen with a yogurt too (I think it was only for one specific flavor). Anyway, I did save myself from one coupon mistake this month–for cereal. For the past few weeks, I was eating Safeway Signature Select Raisin Bran (or Raisin Granola Clusters, or whatever the hell they call it). I got a digital coupon for a Signature Select cereal, and the cereal I usually ate was on the picture. Yay! However, after reading the fine print on the coupon, I saw it was only for cereals from 11.3 to 13 oz. But my Raisin Bran was over 14 oz. And they don’t make it in any other sizes. So the picture didn’t actually match the coupon. 

IT WAS A RUSE! A CLEVER ATTEMPT TO TRICK ME!

So now I’ve learned to read the fine print on every coupon at Safeway and never take anything at face value (sigh). Also, I eat oatmeal now. 

I spent more money overall in October than I did in September.

In September, I spent a total of $196.12 out of a budgeted $200. In October, I spent a total of $218.84, which is $18.84 over what I anticipated spending. There are two things that stick out in my budget that I think caused this over spending–pea protein and carrot cake supplies.

I recently had an appointment with a Registered Dietician (yet another perk HR gives us in exchange for not paying everyone a decent living wage in the HCOL south bay). After spieling off my laundry list of dietary issues (egg intolerance, possible soy intolerance, IBS, vegetarian), she suggested pea protein. Trader Joe’s had it the cheapest at 16.5 oz for $11.99. So, that’s $12 outside of what I usually eat. If I weren’t an athlete, I wouldn’t care; however, if I ever want to send V7 (climbing grade), I need to make sure I’m fueling myself properly.

Additionally, I wanted to make carrot cake. I had some coupons for supplies at Sprouts, but I ended up not being able to access them. Like many grocery stores, Sprouts has a rewards program/coupon situation. However, unlike many grocery stores, you can’t just type in your phone number on the keypad; you have to open the Sprouts app and scan a barcode in order to access your coupons. While I was in line, the app logged out. Then the app froze, and I couldn’t log back in. There were only two cashiers and I started to get really flustered because the line was really long, so I just gave up and paid full price for everything. THANKS, SOCIAL ANXIETY!

(Also, Sprouts, seriously, just let me put in my damn phone number.) 

(Also, if you’re still reading this, the vegan coconut-based frosting was super gross. Next time I’ll just get confectioner’s sugar, vanilla, and earth balance.)

So yeah, my grand plan of trying to get my grocery budget down to $175 for the month did not go well. 

Was this a huge problem? No. The $200/month is a limit I set for myself in order to help maximize the amount of money I put toward things like savings and student loans. I am very fortunate in even having the option of overspending on groceries; many people (my family in my childhood, for instance) don’t have that option. However, I am still committed to getting my grocery bill down (which honestly, if I just ate all the crap in my cupboards, I would probably spend like $10 on other groceries).  

Can I meet my $175 goal in November? LET’S FIND OUT!

Open Grocery February 2020

Hello everyone, and welcome to Open Grocery, my monthly post in which I provide you an itemized list of every single food item I purchased in the previous month.

OPEN GROCERY 2020 SPREADSHEET

In my spending plan, I usually denote about $200 a month to groceries. I live alone, so $50 a week shouldn’t be too hard to handle, right?

Oh, what a fool I was.

While I’ve been kind of successful meeting this limit in previous months, January’s spending blew this right out of the water. In January, I spent a whopping $241.61 cents on groceries, or over forty dollars more than I had anticipated.

Uh… whoops

What caused this drastic increase in grocery costs, other than my own lack of self control? 

I blame two things: January was kind of a long month, and I am focusing on getting more protein in my diet.

First off, January. Other than for some reason feeling like it was several weeks longer than it should be, January also felt long because it marked my return from vacation. Before vacation, I tried to eat down as much of my in-house food as possible. I was gone for almost two weeks, so I didn’t want any vegetables or open boxes of cereal languishing on my counter until reaching the point of spoilage. As such, upon my return, I really didn’t have much other than a box of oatmeal and one Annie’s Mac and Cheese (my usual post-travel kitchen staples).

On December 31st, I visited both Sprouts and Trader Joe’s, in an effort to refill the kitchen. They’re included on this spreadsheet because they were purchased for consumption in January. This brought the bill up a bit.

Additionally, January has 31 days, so there’s one extra day in which to feed myself.

Secondly, I am focusing on getting more protein in my diet. Amongst my New Year Resolutions’ were tracking my macros and meeting my protein goal at least three times a week. Because of my many dietary restrictions (IBS, egg intolerance, vegetarian), my protein options can be a little limited, and traditional cheap protein fixes like just eating a ton of beans doesn’t work for me. Something my dietician recommended was pea protein powder. I bought two big jugs of protein powder this month, which together cost $28.00 (I upgraded from original to vanilla, which is $2.00 more a jug, but god does it taste better). 

In an effort to fix my gut bacteria and get more healthy probiotics in my life, I bought kimchi twice this month. Kimchi is usually between $6 and $6.50 when it’s on sale at Sprouts, so two packages of kimchi were a little over $12.00. 

These two products–the pea protein and the kimchi–equal $40, so maybe my overspending can be explained by these. 

So, I went over $40 over. Am I going to beat myself up about it? Not too much. While I still focus on reducing my costs so I can throw as much money toward my student loan debt as possible, I don’t want to sacrifice my health and happiness by making too many cuts in my grocery bill. It’s worth more to me to have a healthy body than to pay off my loans early.

I’m not throwing the spending plan out the window though. For February, I am still aiming for only $200 a month, but I expect that I will blow that out of the water again. My partner is visiting for two weeks (yay!), and, as an athletic dude, he eats a lot

However, he’s totally fine with eating an entire can of beans for dinner, so maybe it will be ok.