Open Grocery February 2020

Hello everyone, and welcome to Open Grocery, my monthly post in which I provide you an itemized list of every single food item I purchased in the previous month.

OPEN GROCERY 2020 SPREADSHEET

In my spending plan, I usually denote about $200 a month to groceries. I live alone, so $50 a week shouldn’t be too hard to handle, right?

Oh, what a fool I was.

While I’ve been kind of successful meeting this limit in previous months, January’s spending blew this right out of the water. In January, I spent a whopping $241.61 cents on groceries, or over forty dollars more than I had anticipated.

Uh… whoops

What caused this drastic increase in grocery costs, other than my own lack of self control? 

I blame two things: January was kind of a long month, and I am focusing on getting more protein in my diet.

First off, January. Other than for some reason feeling like it was several weeks longer than it should be, January also felt long because it marked my return from vacation. Before vacation, I tried to eat down as much of my in-house food as possible. I was gone for almost two weeks, so I didn’t want any vegetables or open boxes of cereal languishing on my counter until reaching the point of spoilage. As such, upon my return, I really didn’t have much other than a box of oatmeal and one Annie’s Mac and Cheese (my usual post-travel kitchen staples).

On December 31st, I visited both Sprouts and Trader Joe’s, in an effort to refill the kitchen. They’re included on this spreadsheet because they were purchased for consumption in January. This brought the bill up a bit.

Additionally, January has 31 days, so there’s one extra day in which to feed myself.

Secondly, I am focusing on getting more protein in my diet. Amongst my New Year Resolutions’ were tracking my macros and meeting my protein goal at least three times a week. Because of my many dietary restrictions (IBS, egg intolerance, vegetarian), my protein options can be a little limited, and traditional cheap protein fixes like just eating a ton of beans doesn’t work for me. Something my dietician recommended was pea protein powder. I bought two big jugs of protein powder this month, which together cost $28.00 (I upgraded from original to vanilla, which is $2.00 more a jug, but god does it taste better). 

In an effort to fix my gut bacteria and get more healthy probiotics in my life, I bought kimchi twice this month. Kimchi is usually between $6 and $6.50 when it’s on sale at Sprouts, so two packages of kimchi were a little over $12.00. 

These two products–the pea protein and the kimchi–equal $40, so maybe my overspending can be explained by these. 

So, I went over $40 over. Am I going to beat myself up about it? Not too much. While I still focus on reducing my costs so I can throw as much money toward my student loan debt as possible, I don’t want to sacrifice my health and happiness by making too many cuts in my grocery bill. It’s worth more to me to have a healthy body than to pay off my loans early.

I’m not throwing the spending plan out the window though. For February, I am still aiming for only $200 a month, but I expect that I will blow that out of the water again. My partner is visiting for two weeks (yay!), and, as an athletic dude, he eats a lot

However, he’s totally fine with eating an entire can of beans for dinner, so maybe it will be ok. 

Open Grocery November 2019

It’s the first Tuesday of the month, and you know what that means–it’s time for the monthly Open Grocery post! What’s Open Grocery? Open Grocery is a series of posts that include detailed information about all of my grocery purchases for the month. The spreadsheet I’ve included has a dated and itemized list of all my grocery purchases, down to the poundage. 

The November numbers have been crunched, and out of my total budgeted $200, I spent: $198.51.

Hooray! I’m in budget for the month!

Hooray for me, indeed.

This is great, because last month I went $18.84 over and spend a total of $218.84. It’s good to see that I’m moving back in the right direction. This month’s total is much closer to September’s, when I spent $196.12.

(I should note that at the end of last month’s post, I put that I had a goal of $175 for November. I then promptly forgot about that goal. Let’s put it on the docket for January 2020, shall we?) 

For a full breakdown of everything I bought, when, and where, please check out the Open Grocery 2019 Google Sheet

So, what changed in the last month?

For one, I bought more alcohol. What can I say? It’s the holiday season. While last month I spent $13.28 on alcohol for the month (from a grocery store, anyway), this month I spent $31.97. 

One major purchase accounted for this change–on 11/26, I bought a box of wine. It was on sale for $18.99 compared to the usual $24.99, and supposedly it contains three full bottles of wine. Now, I enjoy a glass of wine every now and then; however, since I live alone and don’t like to have people over, my problem was that I would buy a bottle and then feel obligated to drink the whole thing before it went bad. The magic of boxed wine is that it can last much longer after being opened than bottled wine. According to the Black Box website, their wines stay fresh up to six weeks after opening. This means I don’t have to chug a glass and a half every evening for three nights straight (more than I want to drink anyway) just to avoid the guilt of throwing away what didn’t get finished. 

I plan on nursing this box for as long as possible and not buying any alcohol for my time at home in December. Uh, we’ll see how well this plan works out…

The biggest victory this month came from avoiding coupon errors! In September, I lost $14.06 to coupon errors. In October, I lost a whopping $27.25 to coupon errors. I count this as “lost” money because most of these products–October and the disastrous carrot cake ingredients in particular–would not have been purchased without the coupons. This month, I avoided this problem by (a) avoiding a lot of coupon-required purchases altogether and (b) reading the coupons more closely to understand if only specific sizes or flavors were covered. 

Me and you, Honey Boo Boo. Only I think you’re referring to success, and I’m just referring to avoiding failure.

Additionally, for the two months I stayed in budget, I made one less trip to the grocery store. In September and November, I made seven trips to the store (which seems like a lot, but in my defense, I eat a lot of fresh veggies!), while in October I made eight. I’m trying to make a conscious effort to ask myself–can I go just one more day?–before running off to the store. I’m trying especially hard to do this for December, since I’ll be out of my apartment for twelve days (and as such need to eat anything that may expire during that time!). 

What can we expect for next month? Well, the budget will need to be adjusted–I will be traveling from December 19th to the 30th, so I’ve calculated a monthly grocery budget of approximately $130 dollars (the usual $200 divided by 31, multiplied by the 19 full days and two half-days I will be home, and rounded up to look better). I’m also trying to purchase zero alcohol and concentrate on mainly buying fruits, vegetables, and yogurt, while eating up all the rest of the food in my house.

That’s all for this month! Shorter than the previous two posts, but honestly, I just don’t have that much to say. They’re groceries, y’all. December will be a lighter month, and then hopefully in 2020 I can discipline myself down to $175/month!

Open Grocery October 2019

Last month I made the first post in a series called Open Grocery. Every month, I will share a spreadsheet with all of my grocery purchases–dated, itemized, and notated. 

Not my groceries! Photo from pexels.com.

Why am I doing this? 

For one thing, I think it’s interesting to see patterns in my own spending. Is there something I’m spending an inordinate amount on that’s unnecessary? Are certain items flukes? Am I buying too much processed food and not enough fresh food?

Also, lists and spreadsheets are fun. And it’s nice to have some cold hard statistics through this blog, which often explores topics that Gaby Dunn referred to in Season 2 Episode 1 of her podcast Bad with Money as “Finances and Feelings.” 

If you’d like to get into the cold hard numbers, they’re available on this Open Grocery 2019 Google Sheet

Here are some fun facts from the last two months:

I spent an almost identical amount on fake meat products in October as I did in September.

In September, I spent $12.67 on various meat substitutes (LightLife burgers, hi-protein veggie burgers from TJ’s). In October, I spent $12.96 on meat substitutes (more hi-protein veggie burgers, tofurkey lunch slices). Because fake meat is generally more expensive than natural vegan proteins like tofu or beans, this was something I was planning on cutting out in the future; however, $13 is doable (especially when I get 26 grams of protein from one $1.75 veggie patty). 

I spent more money on alcohol in October than I did in September.

This one doesn’t surprise me. My partner left Germany at the end of August, and I just ended up not really drinking after he left. I figured it would just make me sad. Now that I’m used to the life of a lonely spinster (ha ha ha), I’ve started drinking a teensy bit more. In September I bought a bottle of wine; in October I bought a six-pack of beer and one can of sparkling wine (WOOO). Like the fake meat, this amount isn’t so large that I feel the need to cut back. 

I discovered that Safeway digital coupons don’t always depict the correct products. 

One of my downfalls from last month were coupon errors. As in the case of the Chocolove bars, sometimes the coupon shows an item, and we think we understand what it’s for, but the fine print indicates otherwise. This also happened with my Outshine fruit bars–the coupon was for only the regular fruit bars, not the chocolate-dipped ones (even though they’re the same price, you just get one less bar). I had this happen with a yogurt too (I think it was only for one specific flavor). Anyway, I did save myself from one coupon mistake this month–for cereal. For the past few weeks, I was eating Safeway Signature Select Raisin Bran (or Raisin Granola Clusters, or whatever the hell they call it). I got a digital coupon for a Signature Select cereal, and the cereal I usually ate was on the picture. Yay! However, after reading the fine print on the coupon, I saw it was only for cereals from 11.3 to 13 oz. But my Raisin Bran was over 14 oz. And they don’t make it in any other sizes. So the picture didn’t actually match the coupon. 

IT WAS A RUSE! A CLEVER ATTEMPT TO TRICK ME!

So now I’ve learned to read the fine print on every coupon at Safeway and never take anything at face value (sigh). Also, I eat oatmeal now. 

I spent more money overall in October than I did in September.

In September, I spent a total of $196.12 out of a budgeted $200. In October, I spent a total of $218.84, which is $18.84 over what I anticipated spending. There are two things that stick out in my budget that I think caused this over spending–pea protein and carrot cake supplies.

I recently had an appointment with a Registered Dietician (yet another perk HR gives us in exchange for not paying everyone a decent living wage in the HCOL south bay). After spieling off my laundry list of dietary issues (egg intolerance, possible soy intolerance, IBS, vegetarian), she suggested pea protein. Trader Joe’s had it the cheapest at 16.5 oz for $11.99. So, that’s $12 outside of what I usually eat. If I weren’t an athlete, I wouldn’t care; however, if I ever want to send V7 (climbing grade), I need to make sure I’m fueling myself properly.

Additionally, I wanted to make carrot cake. I had some coupons for supplies at Sprouts, but I ended up not being able to access them. Like many grocery stores, Sprouts has a rewards program/coupon situation. However, unlike many grocery stores, you can’t just type in your phone number on the keypad; you have to open the Sprouts app and scan a barcode in order to access your coupons. While I was in line, the app logged out. Then the app froze, and I couldn’t log back in. There were only two cashiers and I started to get really flustered because the line was really long, so I just gave up and paid full price for everything. THANKS, SOCIAL ANXIETY!

(Also, Sprouts, seriously, just let me put in my damn phone number.) 

(Also, if you’re still reading this, the vegan coconut-based frosting was super gross. Next time I’ll just get confectioner’s sugar, vanilla, and earth balance.)

So yeah, my grand plan of trying to get my grocery budget down to $175 for the month did not go well. 

Was this a huge problem? No. The $200/month is a limit I set for myself in order to help maximize the amount of money I put toward things like savings and student loans. I am very fortunate in even having the option of overspending on groceries; many people (my family in my childhood, for instance) don’t have that option. However, I am still committed to getting my grocery bill down (which honestly, if I just ate all the crap in my cupboards, I would probably spend like $10 on other groceries).  

Can I meet my $175 goal in November? LET’S FIND OUT!

Open Grocery – September 2019

Welcome to the first post in a series titled Open Grocery!

I love this photo because it was described as ‘Cabbage, Up Close.’ Image from pexels.com.

Once a month, near the beginning of the month, I will post my entire grocery bill from the previous month–including a breakdown of every grocery food purchase I made during the month and whether or not it was on sale and/or I had a coupon. There are two main reasons why I want to do this.

I want to keep myself accountable in regards to budget. Currently, I have a budget of $200/month for my own grocery needs. In theory, this amount should be more than enough to cover my diet. However, sometimes I have a tendency to slip novelty items into my cart–for example, fruit bars or cookies–that don’t directly correlate to a healthy diet. I don’t feel like I need to cut these items out entirely (everyone should have a cookie now and then!), but I think it would be interesting to see just how much I’m spending on them. This budgetary concern also includes accidentally buying damaged products–but more on that later.

Additionally, I thought it would be a great exercise in seeing how much it actually costs to feed a single human being* in a month. Frankly, the $200/month I have budgeted is probably excessive, given my actual nutritional needs. It would be an interesting experience to see how low I can get my bill while still meeting all my dietary concerns. Also, as of February 2019, the maximum monthly allotment for SNAP for a household of one is $194–I think it would be a useful exercise to see just how you can stretch that amount.

For the sake of transparency, here are some things that may make my bill different than yours:

  1. I don’t have high caloric requirements. I am currently about 112 pounds and about five feet four inches in height. Even though I am athletic and go to the gym several times a week, I’m not a bodybuilder or currently trying to put on more muscle mass. As such, the amount of calories I require each day may be much lower or higher than others, depending on their nutritional needs and fitness goals.
  2. I have gastrointestinal issues. My doctor thinks I have IBS; as such, there are certain foods that I can and cannot eat if I want to be comfortable. This means I can’t always pick the cheapest foods at the grocery store or only eat what is on-sale. Beans are thrown around a lot as an affordable protein option–unfortunately, if I eat too many, my bowels riot, so I have to find other sources of protein as well.
  3. I try to eat a plant-based diet (with some cheese thrown in on occasion). I don’t purchase meat, eggs, milk, or butter. I do purchase hard and/or goat cheese sometimes. While I should stick with getting protein from pulses, my IBS makes it difficult to eat more than small amounts of things like beans and lentils. This leads to a tendency to rely too heavily on expensive protein-added products as opposed to more ‘natural’ sources of protein. 

So let’s get started!

If you’re interested, you can view my September 2019 groceries in this google sheet

Overall, I spent around $196 for groceries in September 2019 (I lost $0.90 somewhere between the receipts and the totals, but whatever).

Several things affected this amount: (1) not paying attention to coupons and whether or not they were applied correctly; (2) accidentally purchasing damaged products; (3) vegan meat substitutes; and (4) alcohol.

  1. Coupons. Some of the products I purchased should have had coupons applied to them. The biggest store that I had problems with coupons at was Safeway. On the website, shoppers can download digital coupons to their accounts and, when they type in their phone number on the credit card key pad, they get those coupons taken off. For some reason, for several of my products, the coupons were not applied. On one particular visit, there was an especially long line and the cashier was in a hurry to get me rung up. I didn’t notice that the coupons hadn’t worked correctly until I got home. Next time I go, I will ensure that the coupons ring up correctly–regardless of how fast they’re trying to push me through. I also had issues with coupons at Sprouts, although these issues were my fault–for example, on my first visit, I didn’t know that you had to download the app in order to have your coupons applied; I thought I could just enter in my phone number to get my coupons (you know, like at pretty much every other grocery store in the US). Nope! As such, a couple items I had coupons for rang up at full price. The other coupon I had issues with was a BOGO Chocolove coupon; apparently it was only for one specific flavor. I have now learned a lesson in checking the text of every coupon I intend to use.
  2. Damaged Products. Out of everything I purchased this month, I had issues with two products. The first was a pack of tempeh I purchased at Sprouts. I didn’t look at it properly until a few days later when I was going to eat it; however, there was a paper-thin slash across the front of the package. I’m guessing that it was the first layer in the box, and when someone used a box-cutter to open the box, they accidentally slashed the first layer of tempeh and either didn’t notice it or didn’t care. Regardless, $3.29 down the drain, because lord only knows how long that package had been open. The second damaged product was a Silk yogurt I bought at Safeway that was three weeks past the sell-by date. I didn’t take this off the grocery bill because I accidentally ate it before I saw the date (although I didn’t get sick, so I learned something?). This was slightly hilarious to me because I usually check the date on every refrigerated item I buy. So, in essence, what should I remember?–CONSTANT VIGILANCE.
  3. Vegan Meat Substitutes. I go back and forth on this one. Mostly, my downfall in this category this month was purchasing two packages of Lightlife Plant-Based Burger Patties. I’ve been a vegetarian for over four and a half years now, but gosh do I remember what burgers taste like. This new frontier of plant-based burger-y burgers has rocked my world. However, at $2 to $4 for a single patty**, it’s not a cost-effective way of eating, although in some instances I cut the patty in half and spread it over two meals. I also purchased a four-pack of soysage, but I feel less bad about that because I usually stretch those out over eight meals. As long as they’re on sale and I am mindful of the cost per meal, I’m willing to forgive this a little bit.
  4. Alcohol. I bought a bottle of wine for like $10. I include it in my grocery bill because I consume it and I buy it at the grocery store, but alcohol is not a necessity. In fact, now that my partner is gone, I don’t even really enjoy having a drink that much anymore. And if I buy an entire bottle of wine, I feel pressured to drink it all before it goes bad, and since I’m such a lightweight, this just leads to headaches and lethargy the next day. So, I think I’ve pretty much decided that, at least until my partner gets back, I’m probably just a social drinker as opposed to an enjoy-a-glass-at-the-end-of-a-long-day type of gal. 

So there we have it! A month’s worth of groceries for a single human and my lessons learned. The goal for next month: maybe get it down to $175? We’ll see!

(But no pressure though.)

* In the US — California — South Bay area.

** Not to mention the saturated fat. THIS IS NOT A HEALTH FOOD, Y’ALL.