One Week 2020 Resolution Check-In

Welcome to 2020! Welcome to a new year of Enough, but better!

For the first post of the new year (and new decade, woo!) I wanted to touch base with the resolutions I discussed in my last post of 2019. Have I been successful in sticking with these resolutions? 

Resolution #1: Each week, I will create at least one creative/non-personal finance post for Enough, but better in addition to any personal finance posts I make. 

On track, if you count this post.

As I explained in my previous post, one of my goals for the new year is rewiring Enough, but better to further align with its intended purpose–a navel-gazing and, perhaps, narcissistic exploration into my own personal self, interests, and values (although using that kind of language is not in line with goals of self-love, ha ha). Part of that rewiring includes writing one post per week for Enough, but better than is not related to personal finance. 

This blog wasn’t intended to be a personal finance blog. Personal finance and FIRE/FIOR is definitely a huge interest of mine, but it’s not what I want to focus all my time and energy on. And, frankly, I think it makes me obsess too much over money to the detriment of creating a life that I find fulfilling and enjoyable in the moment.

Does this mean I’m giving myself carte blanche to go crazy with spending money on art supplies and exotic vacations? No, no it doesn’t. But does this mean I am allowing myself to actually get supplies to paint if I fucking want to, because it brings me joy? Yes.

Channeling some Bob Ross energy.

Besides, what’s the point of retiring early if you don’t know what to do with all your free time? 

Resolution #2: I will get off the internet by 7:30 pm every night. 

On track.

I anticipated this being one of the harder resolutions to stick to–and I was right.

Especially since it’s winter and the days remain dark and cold (and yes, even though I live in California, I am constantly cold), I’ve made a habit of coming home, crawling under the many covers of my bed, and binging YouTube videos until I grow too hungry to ignore my stomach. Then I cook and sit my sorry self right back on the couch. No more, I say!

I just can’t anymore.

So far, the hardest night to stick to this resolution was last Friday, when I came home from the gym. On work days when I go to the gym, I usually don’t get home until around 6:45 pm or 7:00 pm. Since I currently live alone, I like to watch shows or YouTube videos while I cook and eat. On Friday, I had barely finished eating at 7:30 pm. Without this resolution, I would have sat and watched for another half hour or so before getting on with my evening. 

Gym nights are going to be tough.

HOWEVER…

…I’ve been really pleased with what I’ve been able to accomplish by forcing myself to abide by this rule. By essentially giving myself an extra two hours or so each evening, I’ve been able to spend more time setting myself up for success in the morning. I pick out my outfit for the next day (which leads to me looking a little more put together at work, also a goal for this year, ha ha). I get my gym bag together so everything is ready for me to grab when I walk out the door in the morning, which means I actually have my headphones when I want them (hooray!). 

It also gives me time to plan my meals for the next day (which helps with Resolution #4, as you’ll see below). I’ve been making overnight oats for work mornings, so all I have to do is grab breakfast from the fridge, and that breakfast is actually healthy and well-balanced. I also have time to prepare a healthy lunch, which means more vegetables and delicious prepared meals instead of a hunk of cheese and crackers or whatever weird finger-foods I have lying about my house. 

It also gives me more time to read. I just started re-reading the Lord of the Rings trilogy for the first time in about ten years, and I’m already finished with the first book. (If you needed more proof about how big of a nerd I am, here you go.) I also might have gone a little crazy at the half price book store and bought three books about Buddhism over the weekend, so it’s good that I have more reading time now (cultivating that sense of peace, y’all).

Overall, although this resolution can be difficult to meet (and it is very tempting to watch just one more youtube video), I’m super happy with how it’s providing me with time to optimize the rest of my life.

Resolution #3: I will be active every day.

On track.

As I expected, this resolution is the easiest by far. I was already pretty active in my everyday life before making this resolution; this was just to ensure that I didn’t have any off days. Getting 7500 steps on days that I don’t go to the gym or lift at home can be a little challenging sometimes, depending on my schedule–for instance, on Saturday I ended up just walking in circles around my apartment for twenty minutes to make sure I got my final steps in (if I walk to work, this isn’t a big problem, but I don’t work on Saturdays).

She makes it look so fucking easy. Also, please enjoy the A+ gif quality.

Yesterday, however, was pretty easy–I had a health appointment in the morning and ended up at the hospital earlier than anticipated. I strolled around the perimeter about four times before going in for my apartment, and then I walked to work and back home. Overall, I netted about 11,900 steps without much effort on my part (other than lifting up my feet, that is). 

Resolution #4: I will track my macros at least six days a week and aim to meet my protein goal at least three days a week. 

Mostly on track. 

I love spreadsheets. That should be fairly evident, considering that my hobbies include personal finance and I currently track every grocery item I buy, the date, the price, the store it came from, and whether or not it was on sale. I make budget spreadsheets for fun, for the enjoyment of people at large. Tracking my macros is just another way for me to express my love of spreadsheets (otherwise known as my deep-seated need for control in an uncontrollable world). 

However, focusing on six days a week instead of every day leaves me with the flexibility to have a meal out or eat weird and/or complicated things without feeling like I’m failing at meeting my goal. 

For example, on Saturday I met my best friend for brunch at a place in Berkeley (The Butcher’s Son, a vegan deli and bakery). I had their Fried Chicken Bagelwich, which (WAS DELICIOUS AND) included house-made “fried chicken”, “bacon”, and “cream cheese.” What were the macros for this sandwich? I’m sure someone in the universe knows, but I sure as hell don’t. Could I estimate something similar? Maybe. Would I rather do something else with my time? Yes, 100%. 

If I had a strict track-everything-everyday resolution, I would be miserable, because I would feel stressed out whenever I went out to eat or found my way into a free lunch situation at work. However, by giving myself a day off every week, I can still achieve my goal and track my macros without getting discouraged by complicated meals or turning down invitations for free food (I just love free food). 

The reason I’m only “mostly on track” with this goal is the protein. Part 2 of this resolution is to meet my protein goal three times a week. Calculating my macros to align with my athletic goals has given me a protein goal of 99 grams a day.

I’m a vegetarian who can’t eat eggs or more than a quarter of a cup of beans or tofu (obligatory shout-out to my IBS!), so protein has always been a challenge for me. I didn’t realize how little protein I was actually getting until I started counting my macros. 

Previously, I was averaging around only 40 to 50 grams of protein in a day. This is fine for the average bear, but since I’m working harder at achieving my fitness goals (bouldering V6 indoors* consistently by the end of the year and maybe breaking into V7?), I need more to maximize my performance. Also, I’m incredibly vain, and I would love to have some muscles. 

#spongebobgains

Because of the aforementioned dietary limitations, I’ve been supplementing my meals with pea protein powder. This gives me an extra 30 grams of protein spread throughout my day, which really helps in meeting my goals. 

If I can meet my protein goal today (the last day of the week), I will have met it three times for the week. Huzzah! 

Overall

Overall, I’m doing pretty good. However, it’s only been a week, so it’s a bit early to be clapping myself on the back too much. Some studies suggest that 80% of resolutions fail by the second week of February. Let’s check back in then to see how the resolutions are progressing (and if I’ve still managed to break my late night internet addiction, ha ha).

How are your resolutions going? Feel free to share your struggles or successes in the comments!


*Feel free to make fun of me for having indoor climbing goals, but I hate to be cold, so there, ha ha.

Making Resolutions that Mean Something to You

It’s nearly the end of the year, and this one’s a doozy. The 2010s are coming to an end, and a new decade is dawning. It’s a fresh start; an opportunity to make better, improved versions of ourselves. 

But can we actually achieve these shiny new dreams, these visions of self-actualization that we see in our mind? Absolutely! However, there are a few things we should keep in mind when we’re making our resolutions. 

First, I’d like to reflect on one of my resolutions from last year that was a big fat failure.

A Failed Resolution

One of my resolutions for 2019 was to study more German.

My partner speaks German. Quite well, actually. He’s over in Germany this very instant working, volunteering with a refugee organization, and finishing his second Master’s degree (yes, I’m bragging about him). He’s told me before that it would be great if I spoke German too, so we could tell each other secrets when we’re out and about. 

Additionally, we have several mutual friends who are Austrian, and it would be great if I could also converse with their friends and family whenever we visit. The last time I went to visit these friends in Vienna, one of them had to read the menu out at the restaurant to me to make sure I ordered something vegetarian. At the time, I felt like a little kid depending on their dad to help them navigate the adult world. It wasn’t a great look.

I’m flying out to Munich soon (two days after this post goes up, actually), and I told myself that this time I was going to study and work hard and be able to order my own food like a ‘big kid,’ etc. etc. And guess what?

I still don’t speak German. 

What happened? Well, I studied a bit. But nothing ever seemed to stick.

Frankly, learning languages has never been my forte. It took me an entire summer of four-hour-long classes to scrape together a ‘C’ in French so I could meet the language requirement for getting my ‘BA.’ My high school French teacher mostly told us stories of him being in Vietnam and how one of his daughters was great and the other daughter was a huge disaster. I passed that class with the help of google translate. 

The sentiments of my entire high school French class.

To me, languages in my brain are like water flowing through a sieve. Most of it just goes right on through. Occasionally one word or phrase will inexplicably attach itself to my brain–die katze! der schnee!–but the rest of it just leaves as soon as it arrives*. 

Look at me. I have excuses upon excuses. But what’s the truth? 

The truth is I just don’t care. 

I don’t care about speaking German. Other than my partner and a handful of friends, I don’t know anyone who speaks German. The only type of German I encounter in my work is Middle German, which isn’t what is used now (Modern German). This will be the second time I travel to a German speaking country, and the first time I will be there for more than five days. 

Would speaking German be helpful? Yes. 

Will I be perfectly fine without it? Also yes. 

It takes a huge amount of effort and energy to make a language stick, and frankly, I don’t think the payoff is enough with this particular goal. I’d still like to take a class or something at some point, but the motivation to self-study just isn’t there.

This resolution was bound to fail because I didn’t have a ‘Why.’ 

Finding a ‘Why’

What’s important to you? What type of life do you envision yourself leading?

I’d say the main problem is we haven’t invested enough time thinking about why our resolutions are important to us.

If you didn’t have to worry about financially support yourself, what is the ideal life that you would want to live? 

The answers to these questions can help you figure out your ‘why.’ Those of us in the FIRE/FIOR community may have already thought about this a lot. It’s the reason so many of us are trying to get out of debt and stash money away to become financially independent–we desire a life that aligns with our deepest goals, desires, and beliefs. 

I encourage you to take a long look at your life and pinpoint hobbies or goals that will more closely align your life with the one your heart wishes you could life. 

There are a lot of articles out there that claim early retirement causes early death. However, this seems to be associated with these individuals increasing the amount of time they spend sedentary and decreasing the number of social interactions they have. So, it’s not retirement that kills them, it’s a dearth of hobbies or friends. They don’t have activities or relationships that have significant meaning to them.

What gives you meaning? What makes life worth living? What’s something you always wanted to do? When you find the answers to these questions, you can start forming the basis of your resolutions. 

Supporting Your ‘Why’ with a Plan

Piggy over at Bitches Get Riches wrote a great post two years ago about how she has achieved her resolution every year for the past few years. Her secret? She makes her resolutions SMART goals. For those of you unfamiliar with SMART goals (a staple of corporate and nonprofit growth), these are goals that are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Timely. 

If I were to re-imagine my resolution of learning German as a SMART goal, it might look something like this:

“By December 2019, I will have learned 100 German vocabulary words and 20 useful phrases.” 

“Study German” or “Learn German” or “Speak German” don’t really mean anything to me. How can I see progress or stay motivated if I don’t have any concrete indicators? By making a number, I give myself an easy concrete goal to hit. “Speak German” is difficult. Learning languages takes a long time, and making a goal of “Speak German” feels to me like Sisyphus rolling that damn rock up that hill. The task never ends. I will never achieve the goal.

I’ve a very numbers-motivated person. I have about fifteen spreadsheets between my personal finance and fitness hobbies alone, if that gives you any idea of how obsessive I can be with numeric goals. By quantifying my goal, it becomes achievable. 

Quantifying works for me, but may not work for you. Are you more of a visual person? Create a tumblr or pinterest board to help curate images that inspire you to reach your goal. Make a chart or coloring sheet that you can fill in as you accomplish your goals–for example, there are all kinds of free debt-repayment coloring charts online. Print one out and stick it on your fridge to help motivate you to reach your goal. 

Moving Forward

Next week I’ll delve into my personal ‘whys’ and the goals I created that use those ‘whys’ as their framework. 

What are your resolutions for the new year? What are your ‘whys’, and what steps do you plan on taking to achieve them? Please feel free to leave a comment and let us know!

*The only exception to this was Korean. When I lived in South Korea, I picked up enough to get around, go to the dentist, speak with my students, etc. But I lived there for three and a half years, so the exposure rate was pretty damn high, and in my first year and a half only a handful of my coworkers spoke English, so it was basically a do-or-die situation.